Strabismus Surgery In Adults

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What does it involve?

Strabismus surgery in adults is the treatment to correct this eyesight problem that consists of the loss of parallelism between both eyes insofar as they are not properly aligned and each one points in a different direction.

When is it carried out?

Generally, all cases of strabismus are operable and, where the pathology has appeared during childhood, surgery is possible at any age. This is considered reconstructive surgery in which patients are extremely satisfied with the result and experience a clear improvement in their social lives.

The surgery

The operation, performed in outpatients and with local anaesthetic and sedation or with general anaesthetic, consists of surgery on one or several of the six muscles involved in eye movement to correct the ocular deviation, tightening them, loosening them or repositioning them depending on where the eye is to be aligned.

The surgical approach is extraocular, as the surgeon works on the eyeball, which helps minimise the risk of complications. After surgery, the change experienced by the patient is immediate (although final results are noticed after one month) and the use of prisms is sometimes recommended.

The surgical approach is extraocular, as the surgeon works on the eyeball, which helps minimise the risk of complications. After surgery, the change experienced by the patient is immediate (although final results are noticed after one month) and the use of prisms is sometimes recommended.

The success rate of this surgery may exceed 90%, as it restores the parallelism of the eyes and eliminates the annoying double vision, as well as solving an aesthetic problem with considerable psychological consequences.

In cases where strabismus appears in adulthood, the patient often experiences intermittent or constant double vision (diplopia), which may become extremely incapacitating when performing everyday activities.

Furthermore, childhood strabismus does not cause diplopia, although patients suffering from it often experience:

  • Visual fatigue
  • Problems relating with other people or of self-esteem

It is important to consider the psychosocial implications of ocular deviation, the correction of which not only treats a functional problem but also offers aesthetical benefits.